Ennea-type Communication at WORK (Part 2)



PREVIOUS : Communication at WORK (Part 1)

 

 

WORK STYLE Communication
Type 1-5 (in Part 1)

Type 6
As a Six – your communication style tends to be caring, compassionate, & engaged – witty & warm. You’re excellent at considering & assessing options which you express thoughtfully to your teammates. It’s also true, however, that you believe you must figure things out on your own.

Carrying the weight of that (unrealistic) responsibility can make you anxious & doubt yourself, so it harder to inspire confidence in others.
The challenge is to remember that you’re not actually alone – you’re a part of a team. Find people you trust to use as an accurate barometer of you ideas, when you need reassurance.

📢 Colleagues: If you work with a Six, remember that the more secure they feel, the more relaxed their thinking will be. Avoid putting them on the spot without warning or time to prepare (they need to reflect & balance all possibilities). Whenever possible, help them believe that they’re supported by the team, & that it’s not all on them to make things happen.

Type 7
As a Seven – your communication style is often described as energetic, optimistic & enthusiastic! You have a gift for generative thinking, for envisioning & opening up possibilities. Some of your challenges are about needing to follow through & fill in details.

Also, your preference for starting things (projects, ideas…) can frustrate people who are more methodical or who like to go “deep.” To these team members you can seem scattered or unfocused, like a hummingbird.
Watch for signs that you overwhelm others with so many possibilities. Check to see if you’re connected to colleagues even when you each have different responsibilities & strengths. If not, slow down.

📢 Colleagues: If you work with a Seven, try to embrace the joyful energy of their unbridled curiosity. Look for ways to channel it so it serves the group. Partner a 7 with teammates who are good at putting their ideas into form, rather than expecting the 7 to do it alone. 7s usually shy away from difficult topics, so let them know that negativity isn’t always bad, & when dealt with thoughtfully, it can eventually lead to clarity & agreement.

Type 8
As an Eight – your communication tends to be honest, direct, & assertive. You have a reputation for being generous & loyal to people on your teams. You can be a fierce advocate, & winning your praise can feel like winning the lottery. It’s also true that your commitment to directness can come across as brusque, demanding, even intimidating, which can make teammates retreat to feel safe.

📢 Colleagues: If you work with an Eight, remember that they value directness & welcome being challenged – because it shows where they stand. They appreciate coworkers who can join with them                                                                                                to debate /discuss/ problem-solve honestly. So, take a risk to be bold & straightforward. Chances are you’ll be met with enthusiasm & find new ways to collaborate.

Type 9
As a Nine, your communication style tends to be calming & inclusive. You naturally avoid conflict & choose your written or spoken words carefully, so you don’t offend anyone. Your gift of seeing all perspectives makes you a natural mediator on any team, smoothing out misunderstandings & building connections.

Your challenge is to prepare how well you communicate needs & ideas, so people are clear about where you stand. If you find yourself running on & on, or accommodating each member of your audience, check in with yourself to make sure you have ‘permission’ to say what you really mean. Are it clear, or just trying to be acceptable to your audience? Take the risk of being declarative: “Here’s what I think.”

📢 Colleagues: If you work with a Nine, let them know you really want to understand what they feel or think. Help them “bottom line”it if they’re rambling on about all possible parts of an issue. Gently ask, “What do you think it means?” or, “What do you believe we should do?” Help them trust the creative potential in having courageous conversations about hard topics. Conflict can be very scary, but it doesn’t need be destructive.

NEXT : Improve Communications (#2)

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